Your new favorite food – Momo

It’s been days that I’ve been thinking and thinking on what to write next. I had many ideas in my head but none of them seemed to be inspiring enough. And then I had a palm-slap to the forehead moment – MOMO! How could I possibly forget that mouthwatering food of gods!? Just thinking about it makes my stomach growl and my lips smack in delight. Often times I have dreams of lying on a cloud surrounded by endless supply of momo. OK, that’s clearly exaggeration, but you get the point – I love momo.

Say what? You don’t know what momo is? Well, don’t mind if I fill you in. Apparently there is this land where they take the eggless pasta dough, roll it out thin, fill it with perfectly spiced meat or veggies, and then close it up like neat little packets. And then they steam it! Yes, steam it. And it comes out to be this amazing steaming hot, spicy and juicy concoction that is then dipped in equally wonderful sauces and eaten in one bite. If your mouth can stand the heat from the steam. Or if you had no idea it’s so steaming hot and you, following everyone else’s example, innocently popped the whole thing in your mouth only to realize you no longer feel any part of your mouth, but it’s too late and too awkward to spit it out so you swallow it hoping your guts survive. My point – momos are hot so be careful.

Here’s a little less amateurish description of this amazing and very popular Nepali snack. The dough for momos is quite simple and is made of water and flour, possibly with a tiny bit of salt, and sometimes a bit of yeast. It’s rolled out thin and cut into circles that are then filled with a variety of different fillings. Meat ones could be made from minced pork, chicken, goat, or buffalo combined with shallots, garlic, ginger and a bunch of other spices. Veggie version is usually made of potatoes or cabbage. My understanding is there are other types of filling, but I’ve never tried those. Anyways, to make momo shape, circles are closed into half-moon dumplings, or little round packages. Nepali people are very skilled at making the edge all nice and decorative. Very impressive. Momos are then steamed over a boiling pot of water or stock, and served with chili sauce.

This is not the best looking bunch, but go easy on me - I'm neither a good photographer nor a Nepali chef

This is not the best looking bunch, but go easy on me – I’m neither a good photographer nor a Nepali chef

When in Nepal, or a Nepali restaurant, absolutely and without hesitation order yourself a plate of momos. Oh what the heck, go wild and order two! Dieting can wait for better times. Happy eating!

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Your new favorite food – Momo

  1. remember when three of us were making them in Rochester and we took that picture … mine was so not good looking lol but they still tasted amazing!

  2. The best place for a Momo is at the Chilli Bar in Pokhara, they have the most amazing Chiili Momos, smothered in chilli sauce and vegies, yummmmm.

    • Oh I’ll have to try it then next time I’m in Pokhara. Thanks for the tip. I am not big on spicy momo though, and I am always on the lookout for the ones that have non-spicy filling, and a spicy sauce. I find that to be the best combination. So far, in Kathmandu, best momo I had were in Tamardin in Jawalakhel, and Tamas in Naxal.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s